Monday, October 31, 2016

Gardenway Bus Stop

Henry Shaw Gardenway Bus Stop is an excellent save.

 Gardenway Bus Stop was part of the “Works Project” 
 Built in 1939 by the Civilian Conservation Corps.
 Designed by the National Parks Service.  It became a school bus stop.
 Towards the end of the 20th century plenty of sites surveyed along Highway 66 were sold, re-evaluated as historic treasures, or removed.
This small bus stop wasn’t listed as important.  
It DID come to the attention of Shaw Nature Reserve staff.
 This shelter was relocated to Nature Reserve property in 2002.
 Visitors can rest and refresh here.  There’s a family cemetery, a serpentine wall art exhibit and two trails nearby.
 This is a regular stop for the Wagon Tours.
 

Wagon Tours

I’ll report back after managing any nature hikes.  My first traveling class encourages me to learn and experience more.  I suspect the Nature Reserve will become a favorite destination.  I HIGHLY recommend a wagon tour.  The one I have experienced so far covered a small taste.  Already I’m smitten.  Stairs are provided up into the elevated wagon.  We were offered blankets if we felt chilly.  There is a roof and roll down sides, if needed.  Our class description indicated we’d be attending, no matter what the weather offered.

 Maybe we’ll see each other on the trails sometime soon?

 The Gardenway Bus Stop is number 16 on this trail map.
 307 Pinetum Loop Rd, Gray Summit, MO 63039, (636) 451-3512

Monday, October 24, 2016

Shaw Nature Reserve

I am smitten with Shaw Nature Reserve in Eureka, Missouri.  It takes a little while to get there.  Highway 100 from my house there in forty minutes.

Three Weeks Ago The Nature Reserve Looked Like This:

We loaded into a huge wagon and rode around, learning lots while enjoying the view.
 
A few times we stopped to walk around a site.  We had excellent teachers.

We heard about planned burns, to take care of overgrowth, keep the area healthy, and return the area to a natural state.  Part of the new focus is allowing indigenous plants to thrive.  There are records sharing about the land when settlers arrived.
 “The Bascom House.”

The original farm belonged to Cuthbert S. Jeffries.  The brick house was built by his son-in-law, Confederate Colonel Thomas William Bouldin Crews in 1879.  It was a modern home for the times with bathrooms on each floor.

 He rode his horse to Pacific, Missouri to catch the train into St. Louis, to practice law.

The Missouri Botanical Garden purchased 1300 acres in 1925.  The Crews Farm comprised 320 of the original 1300 acres.

The home is called “The Bascom House” in honor of the the Missouri Botanical Garden Trustee who restored the home.  It is now open to the public.  There is a conference room, offices and a museum.

 
 We stood in a shelter and listened to stories about the land, prairie, wet lands, old growth, from where we were standing all the way to the river.  Amazing things I hope to see with my own eyes someday.
This beautiful tree seems like a “who” to me.

Not so much a camera expert, many things were not captured.  Flocks of bluebirds.  Bluebirds are the state bird, until this day I’d only seen one.  They hang out here.

I saw a persimmon tree, flush with leaves and loaded with fruit.

  Turkey Vulture flew over.  Large, simply floating around in the sky.

Sure look forward to another visit.
 What will greet me?


Monday, October 10, 2016

Hindu Temple of St. Louis

Early morning photos of the Hindu Temple of St. Louis.

 It’s challenging to find a time when there are no cars.  This beautiful place serves more than 16,000 area Hindus.  People arrive all day long and well into the night.

 The temple is a dream in the making.  Registered March, 1988, ground breaking,  April, 1990 and formal inauguration occurred Nov. 1991.

Temple design by V GANAPATI STHAPATI and Associates of CHENNAI, INDIA.

 By Jan. 1995 they were ready to celebrate Initiation.

Looking to the future

 A Community Center is being built.  It gives room for quality educational programs and gatherings.

 For twenty years they have fed, given legal assistance and health screening to any coming for help.  This is a place that extends blessing and assistance to others


 I’d parked far away.  Up a hill, under a tree.  It was a perfect moment.  People arriving, sharing with friends. Clear morning sky, a temple and a “mountain tree.”  There isn’t a day I don’t miss the mountains.  There was a sight, a gift just for me.  Took one camera click.  Then, I could share that moment with you.


  Hindu Temple of St. Louis

725 Weidman Rd. St. Louis, MO 63011
 
We are welcome here!