Monday, October 31, 2016

Gardenway Bus Stop

Henry Shaw Gardenway Bus Stop is an excellent save.

 Gardenway Bus Stop was part of the “Works Project” 
 Built in 1939 by the Civilian Conservation Corps.
 Designed by the National Parks Service.  It became a school bus stop.
 Towards the end of the 20th century plenty of sites surveyed along Highway 66 were sold, re-evaluated as historic treasures, or removed.
This small bus stop wasn’t listed as important.  
It DID come to the attention of Shaw Nature Reserve staff.
 This shelter was relocated to Nature Reserve property in 2002.
 Visitors can rest and refresh here.  There’s a family cemetery, a serpentine wall art exhibit and two trails nearby.
 This is a regular stop for the Wagon Tours.
 

Wagon Tours

I’ll report back after managing any nature hikes.  My first traveling class encourages me to learn and experience more.  I suspect the Nature Reserve will become a favorite destination.  I HIGHLY recommend a wagon tour.  The one I have experienced so far covered a small taste.  Already I’m smitten.  Stairs are provided up into the elevated wagon.  We were offered blankets if we felt chilly.  There is a roof and roll down sides, if needed.  Our class description indicated we’d be attending, no matter what the weather offered.

 Maybe we’ll see each other on the trails sometime soon?

 The Gardenway Bus Stop is number 16 on this trail map.
 307 Pinetum Loop Rd, Gray Summit, MO 63039, (636) 451-3512

Monday, October 24, 2016

Shaw Nature Reserve

I am smitten with Shaw Nature Reserve in Eureka, Missouri.  It takes a little while to get there.  Highway 100 from my house there in forty minutes.

Three Weeks Ago The Nature Reserve Looked Like This:

We loaded into a huge wagon and rode around, learning lots while enjoying the view.
 
A few times we stopped to walk around a site.  We had excellent teachers.

We heard about planned burns, to take care of overgrowth, keep the area healthy, and return the area to a natural state.  Part of the new focus is allowing indigenous plants to thrive.  There are records sharing about the land when settlers arrived.
 “The Bascom House.”

The original farm belonged to Cuthbert S. Jeffries.  The brick house was built by his son-in-law, Confederate Colonel Thomas William Bouldin Crews in 1879.  It was a modern home for the times with bathrooms on each floor.

 He rode his horse to Pacific, Missouri to catch the train into St. Louis, to practice law.

The Missouri Botanical Garden purchased 1300 acres in 1925.  The Crews Farm comprised 320 of the original 1300 acres.

The home is called “The Bascom House” in honor of the the Missouri Botanical Garden Trustee who restored the home.  It is now open to the public.  There is a conference room, offices and a museum.

 
 We stood in a shelter and listened to stories about the land, prairie, wet lands, old growth, from where we were standing all the way to the river.  Amazing things I hope to see with my own eyes someday.
This beautiful tree seems like a “who” to me.

Not so much a camera expert, many things were not captured.  Flocks of bluebirds.  Bluebirds are the state bird, until this day I’d only seen one.  They hang out here.

I saw a persimmon tree, flush with leaves and loaded with fruit.

  Turkey Vulture flew over.  Large, simply floating around in the sky.

Sure look forward to another visit.
 What will greet me?


Monday, October 10, 2016

Hindu Temple of St. Louis

Early morning photos of the Hindu Temple of St. Louis.

 It’s challenging to find a time when there are no cars.  This beautiful place serves more than 16,000 area Hindus.  People arrive all day long and well into the night.

 The temple is a dream in the making.  Registered March, 1988, ground breaking,  April, 1990 and formal inauguration occurred Nov. 1991.

Temple design by V GANAPATI STHAPATI and Associates of CHENNAI, INDIA.

 By Jan. 1995 they were ready to celebrate Initiation.

Looking to the future

 A Community Center is being built.  It gives room for quality educational programs and gatherings.

 For twenty years they have fed, given legal assistance and health screening to any coming for help.  This is a place that extends blessing and assistance to others


 I’d parked far away.  Up a hill, under a tree.  It was a perfect moment.  People arriving, sharing with friends. Clear morning sky, a temple and a “mountain tree.”  There isn’t a day I don’t miss the mountains.  There was a sight, a gift just for me.  Took one camera click.  Then, I could share that moment with you.


  Hindu Temple of St. Louis

725 Weidman Rd. St. Louis, MO 63011
 
We are welcome here! 
 
 
 

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Shrine & Grottos

Black Madonna Shrine & Grottos
 is an example of what one man can do.
Ready?  Let’s begin a walking tour of the Shrine & Grottos.

In 1927, Cardinal Glennon invited Franciscan Brothers from Poland to emigrate and establish a nursing home.  One of these monks was Brother Bronislaus Luszcz.

Madonna in Poland

Growing up in Poland, Bronislaus saw pilgrims honor Mary, Queen of Peace and Mercy.  People traveled to visit the shrine at Jasna Gora.  This monastery and shrine has been a spiritual capital for hundreds of years. People come to commune with the Holy.  There is an icon, a beautiful work of art, that inspires many.  It is known as “The Black Madonna.”   As a young man, Bronislaus embraced a great love and devotion for Mary.  He brought this love to Missouri.

In 1937 Br. Bronislaus began his labor of love

 Missouri offers scrubby, dense forests of oak, walnut, hickory and sycamore trees packed together over limitless rolling hills.  The land can be overgrown with shrubs and inhabited with countless wild creatures.  Clearing the land was a major task.

 Bronislaus built a cedar chapel and placed a painting of Our Lady above the altar.  Soon the chapel offered prayer services.  It became a devotional center.  People came from great distances to visit.

One Sunday evening in 1958 an arsonist set the alter on fire.  The brothers did their best but the blaze consumed the chapel.

Okay, let’s walk about the Shrine & Grottos

Cross the bridge and look back.  There’s a quick view of the open air chapel.

It’s an odd thing to see the last part first.  In 1960, Br. Bronislaus suffered heat stroke.  His final project was this grotto in honor of Our Lady of Fatima.  This is just west of the bridge.

The Bridge.

The grottos are built by hand.  No power tools, no help.  Native rock, from Old Mines, MO, seas shells and costume jewelry were donated by visitors and sent from foreign missions.
St. Francis Grotto

There are figurines of tiny creatures, sparkly bits, statues of bunnies, turtles are other creatures all around this grotto.

Up a hill, our next grotto is to honor Joseph.
 

Taking One Moment
The statues where made by artist Charles Bendel, May 1, 1890 – Feb. 24, 1978.  He immigrated from Czechoslovakia and made his home in St. Louis, MO.  It is said his favorite is a small work of a boy and his dog.

Return to Walk About


Following along the path the entire story begins to unfold . . .
Colored glass bits in the roof – so sunlight light shines on our sleeping friends.
Hikers find their way in winter because they can see this cross from a distance.  

Br. Bronislaus built and rebuilt this grotto.  It isn’t as fancy as the others.  The white inlaid wall is from the original monastery chapel.  Originally a picture was displayed instead of this statue.
There are plenty of stories about people misbehaving over the years.  Drunks smashing cars through walls, vandals do mischief.  Still this place is a marvel.

Assumption Grotto

follow the path

Mother’s Sanctuary – Up the Hill – above the Grottos we’ve already visited
It’s quiet up here.

One more story:
The Happy Birthday Story.

I figure it’s time to go home now.

Shrine & Grottos -100 St. Joseph Hill Rd. Pacific, MO.
Summer Hours: daily 9-7 – Off Season Hours: 9-4 – (Call to verify) Phone:636-938-5361

see ya later.  

love & love,
-g-
  

Saturday, August 20, 2016

“The King Of Horror”

Vincent Leonard Price, Jr. – known as “The King of Horror”  
was born May 27, 1911 in St. Louis, MO.
Vincent Price in Laura trailer Created: 31 December 1943 – Public Domain  
 His performing career spanned across every imaginable genre.  He was at home of stage, screen, recording studio and radio.  
Vincent price has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  
One is for television and one for film. 
 He has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame, too.

 Plenty of Stars and Credits for Performance, but there was much more to The King of Horror.

Vincent was an art collector.  He purchased his first Rembrandt when he was twelve.  He saved his allowance for a year to own that first piece.  It was the beginning of a life long interest in art.  He opened a gallery in Beverly Hills, California in the 1940’s.  He became a well respected collector, and helped establish the Vincent Price Art Museum at East Los Angeles College in Monterey Park, California.  The first teaching art collection owned by a community college in the United States.
  

Gourmet Cook

Vincent Price was recognized as a gourmet cook.  He hosted “Cooking Pricewise” – a cooking television program.  Once he demonstrated how to poach fish in a dish washer on late night TV with Johnny Carson.  He also authored several cookbooks, including,  
“Come Into the Kitchen” 
and 
“A Treasury of Great Recipes.”  
  

Limitless List of Work

 We may remember him best as “The King of Horror.” but his body of work includes every kind of quality performance.  He gave us comedy, bible stories, and even gave his voice to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”

 I remember him from “The Monster Mash.”

 One Classy Gentleman.

A man who limits his interests limits his life.’ – Vincent Price.

 

 

 

 

Monday, July 18, 2016

Center for Home Gardening

I like to pretend the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening is my home.
The outside is nice.  The entire Center for Home Gardening is on 8.5 Acres.  There are countless projects to see, plenty of ideas to try in your own garden.  Specially trained Master Gardeners are on duty to answer questions.  There is a walk-in Plant Doctor service . . Honest!  if you bring in a sample from your ailing plant. an expert will help with information, tips and advice.  There are classes and oodles of free pamphlets filled with information about anything garden.

This is NOT why I pretend, tough.

There’s a Great Room that always sparks my imagination.
Cozy corner especially nice in winter.  It’s peaceful and quiet on any kind of day.  (But, warming by the fire on a chill day is excellent.)
The walls are windows all around.  Plants preferring different types of light teach us their sunlight preferences.
Here are some morning sun plant-people.
Here is the North Window.  Do you suppose these plants yearn for winter?

Look!  A Tree Living Inside!

 isn’t this wonderful?  A little forest tree, right inside.

Here are plants happier to see the sun set.  (West Window)

Facing South, these are mostly cactus-plants.

Outside, there are lots of home gardening ideas.  before we set outside, let’s check out the tree once more . . .
‘bye for now, baby tree! 

Center for Home Gardening Outside Ideas

 Just stepping out the front door, water features, plantings, in pots or yard, gathering spaces . . .once there was an entire section dedicated to planting around mailboxes.  It was festive.
There are ideas for urban living.  Here’s an outdoor kitchen and entertaining area.
Complete with Grill
Here’s a peek at a teeny urban garden.  There’s seating, a water feature, statuary, super cool trees.  The possibility of a quiet paradise in the middle of crowded city spaces.  (click on photo for expanded view)

Let’s begin walking towards the front gate, okay?

A shaded walk about allows protection for us and shade plants.

These portals give inviting glimpses into other types of garden areas.  Does your yard look like this?

I’m ready to head home.

Let’s pass the Chinese Garden along the way. 

‘bye for now!
 



Thursday, June 30, 2016

Conversations with Sleeping Heroes

Days of ceremony happen on occasion.  Flags fly high. Marching bands and parades fill the avenues.   Uniformed dignitaries  stroll to the stage to deliver a speech.  Most of the hours, days and years are quiet.  Good times to hold conversations with sleeping heroes.

 Ten acres were set aside by soldiers in 1826 for burial ground.  Elizabeth Ann Lash, infant daughter of an officer is the first recorded burial.
In March 1863, the U.S. Army established the Jefferson Barracks Post Cemetery.  The cemetery covers 310 acres.  The area sits on bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River.
 In 1866, the Secretary of War designated the post cemetery as a national cemetery.  The Civil War brought remains of many fallen to rest.  In 1922 WW I Veterans required a medical center.  WW II required land from the military post for cemetery space.   Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery became a central location for group interments.  Sleeping Heroes, every kind, color and their limitless stories are here.
Every Row, from every angle – always straight.
spaces for gatherings
There are several shelters placed around the cemetery called “committal shelters.”  There are heroes, along with their spouses, from many different belief systems.  I like the regard for feelings, wishes, rights, or traditions of others I find here.  Many of these heroes did not know this respect and inclusiveness in their waking life.

Visiting Columbaria at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery

I passed the word “Columbarium” a few times.  I admit I did not know understand until reaching a hill top.  It was such a lovely place, I decided to stroll around.
This part of the cemetery has newer dates.  There are nice places to rest and reflect.
 It feels good to listen to the breeze all around, and feel a sense of hope.
Quiet and Comfort is built right in.  It’s as if we are welcome to sit a while.

Conversations with Sleeping Heroes

(some else has come to spend time)

Monuments honor different parts of the story.  There is a monument to Civil war dead, Confederate dead,  WW II, Korean War, Vietnam and the Gulf War.

There are memorials for War Unknowns.

There is a red granite boulder commemorating officers and soldiers who died at Fort Bellefontaine.

One of the older monuments is dedicated to 175 soldiers of the 56th U.S. Colored Infantry.

There is a monument by artist John K. Daniels to honor the 164 Minnesotan officers and soldiers buried at this national cemetery.

There are eight recipients of the Medal of Honor and three Revolutionary War veterans.

U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Michael Blassie was shot down over South Vietnam.  His remains were sent to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.  After a DNA test, his parents asked to bring him home to Jefferson Barracks.

The stories seem to continue forever.